Opinion

Infinite consumption, finite resources

The plug to charge an electric C1 ev'ie is displayed in the car at it's launch in London, Thursday, April 30, 2009. Britain's first four-seater electric car, a 60mph vehicle, called the Citroen C1 ev'ie, and built by the Electric Car Corporation, will be priced at 16,850 pounds (US$ 25,000 euro18,800) .(AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

In the wake of Earth Day, held on April 22 of the year, it is important to take note of a fleeting part of Earth and the human experience—nature itself. With the paradigm of infinite consumption and finite resources, the inevitable truth is that we, as all of humanity, will lose everything that mother nature has to bore due to our inconceivable and ostentatious want for more, more, and more.

Although electric cars and solar power give the facade of “green” and laudably slow down environmental breakdown brought on through carbon build-up, the only thing that one can truly do to end this exponential environmental decay is to slow down consumption of energy. It’s all in the laws of nature.

The first law of Thermodynamics (governing the known universe) states that energy can neither by created nor destroyed.  Despite being a simple concept, it has much more greater implications than what might seem.

The electricity used to power an electric car doesn’t simply come from an outlet. That outlet on a wall  feeds off a power grid that feeds off a site that harnesses the energy from a direct source. Sources that fuel our constant need for electricity usually consist of either the burning of coal, gas, oil or the use of nuclear energy, hydro turbines and etc. All of these sources have adverse effects on the environment one way or the other.

For instance, according to the  Environmental Protective Agency (EPA), the fuel mix percentage used to generate energy for El Paso from coal is at 40.2 percent compared to the national average of 48.5 percent.

Although this might give the impression that El Paso is more environmentally friendly, don’t be fooled. Coal is one of the dirtiest sources of fuel there is. On average, according to www.ucsusa.org, a single coal plant generates 3.7 million tons of carbon dioxide a year (the primary cause of global warming) and numerous other toxic chemicals that taint the air we breath.

Even if the studies that show the collapse of the pillars holding up human civilization to be imminent, we must stay positive and try to ignore the grim outlook that has befallen on many. As citizens of planet Earth, we all need to heed the voice of reason and slow down the progression of environmental breakdown. To try to change what we consume would be futile in the end because the infrastructure that this society is built on could never be changed. However, we could all simply cut back.

Yes, it is that simple.

 

About the Author

Alex Navarro

Responsible for guiding and facilitating the process known as Hanks Media. I have been the publications adviser at Hanks for seven years. The communications department has grown under my watch where I can honestly conclude we run a successful convergence media program. I am always on the lookout for the next generation of leaders. I Love what I do; I love where I work.

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